Book review: “10 Books Every Conservative Must Read” by Benjamin Wiker

Wiker's book claims a lot of ground for the conservative tradition-- he calls on both Chesterton and Lewis, and both Federalist and Anti-Federalist arguments, and even Lord of the Rings. But Wiker's vision of conservatism seems very different from the current embodiment of the Republican party. His discussions surrounding self-government, a distributed economy, and cultivation of virtue seem like a call to return to our roots. It is a refreshing reminder that politics shouldn't be entirely defined by what we're against.

Book review: “Mistakes Were Made, But Not By Me”

What can I possibly have in common with perpetrators of murder and torture? Tavris and Aronson argue, quite a lot. The same patterns you use to justify you yelling at your child or spouse or cheating on a test have been used by governments to justify much worse things-- and still be able to feel like a basically good person. Tavris and Aronson's book really hits hard-- but it's not just a self-help book to become a better person. Self-justification quickly becomes political.

Book review: Saints Vol. II

The Church history department didn't disappoint with Saints Vol II. I will say, this one will be harder to talk about around the dinner table (I already sparked one family fight) A gripping tale with complex characters, moral ambiguity, and great pacing.

Book review: “The Name of the Wind” by Patrick Rothfuss

The "Name of the Wind" has some intangible quality about it that gives it the solidity of a real thing. You have the impression of a world that has only been explored in so small a part, you couldn't finish telling stories about it. It spends time describing simple pleasures like a few beautiful notes on a lute or the feel of a breeze and yet is simultaneously an absolute page-turner.

Exceptions and Grace

There is always a space between the ideal as taught by the gospel and where we are now. Some are more painfully aware of this gap than others. But it is in this space where grace operates.

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